Tag Archives: culture

Two brothers – an agode

We read this very cute agode – legend – in class. I just translated it, in between the homework: Once upon a time there were two brothers. The older one had no wife and no children. The younger brother had … Continue reading

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Above the road stands a tree

Such a beautiful lullaby… We sang it in class today. And the animation is just hilarious! By Itzik Manger Above the road stands a tree, he stands there bent down, all the birds have flied away. Three to the west, … Continue reading

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What is the most Yiddish word?

Now, this is a good question. A gute frage indeed. We asked our shmoos-lerer (teacher in conversation) what in her opinion is the most Yiddish word. We could literally hear the wheels spinning in her head, before she finally exclaimed: … Continue reading

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Undzer nigundl – our little tune

What is as sad as a Yiddish song. And what can make you as freylach – merry. If this song from some reason doesn’t appeal to you, you can always contemplate how on earth it is possible to sing such … Continue reading

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From not-so-foygldik to very foygldik

I have implemented not-so-foygldik (see pre-previous post) into my active vocabular. Since I have not learnt yet what is the opposite, which is a thing that turns out better than expected, I use the term “foygldik” as a term of … Continue reading

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Oyfn pripetshik – At the fireplace

One of the most well-known and popular Yiddish songs is “Oyfn pripetshik”, or “At the fireplace”,written by Mark Warshawsky (1848-1907). Certainly popular before the War, but also after. It was for instance included in Schindler’s List. The topic is learning. … Continue reading

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Not so Hollywoodik

Today after conversation class (which we call schmoozen-klass) we watched this Polish movie from 1937 called “Der Purimshpiler” (The Jester). There were English subtitles, but the actors spoke Yiddish all through. I did understand quite a bit, and it was … Continue reading

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